Labor Day

September 6, 2021

September 6 - Labor Day

What Is Labor Day?

Labor Day is an annual celebration of American workers’ social and economic achievements for the country’s overall growth, stability and strength. From those who clean our streets to those that harvest our food, this country has been established by the toils of men and women throughout our country’s history. Without the working class, we’d have nothing – and for that, we honor them today. This federal holiday on the first Monday of September in any given year pays tribute to you and your fellow workers, and we praise the development of the labor movement and the works. The first Labor Day was held on September 5, 1882 and the government recognized it as a federal holiday in 1894. This holiday also signals the end of summer, with it being the last holiday of the summer season, to provide one last opportunity for families and friends to enjoy much-needed rest and relaxation together before schools re-open in the Fall.

When Is Labor Day?

Labor Day is celebrated on the first Monday of September.

History Of Labor Day

Labor Day was first celebrated on September 5, 1882. In 1884, it was changed to the first Monday of September. The United States government, under President Grover Cleveland, heralded it a federal holiday in 1894.

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