National Crepe Suzette Day

May 6, 2021

What Is National Crepe Suzette Day?

A day to honor this unique and delicious food. French dessert crêpe Suzette consists of fresh crepes and a sauce of butter, sugar, orange juice, zest, and liquor like Grand Marnier or orange Curacao. #nationalcrepesuzetteday

When Is National Crepe Suzette Day?

May 6 is National Crêpe Suzette Day. It is a typical French dessert consisting of a thin dessert pancake with a brandy and citrus sauce, usually set aflame when served.

History Of National Crepe Suzette Day

The origin of the dish and its name is disputed. One claim is that it was created from a mistake made by a fourteen-year-old assistant waiter Henri Charpentier in 1895 at the Maitre at Monte Carlo’s Café de Paris. He was preparing a dessert for the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, whose guests included a beautiful French girl named Suzette. The other claim states that the dish was named in honour of French actress Suzanne Reichenberg (1853–1924), who worked professionally under the name Suzette. In 1897, Reichenberg appeared in the Comédie Française in the role of a maid, during which she served crêpes on stage. Monsieur Joseph, owner of Restaurant Marivaux, provided the crêpes. He decided to flambé the thin pancakes to attract the audience’s attention and keep the food warm for the actors consuming them.

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